Posts Tagged veterans

The Opportunity to Listen (and Learn)

Over the last few months I’ve had the opportunity to listen to a number of amazing speakers at conferences. Each speaker had a great message tailored to the audience and each offered a look into their area of expertise; offering advice that was meaningful and relevant to the industry audience that was listening.

At a conference held earlier this year I listened to keynote speaker Ron Insana, award-winning journalist, financial analyst, commentator and author. His ability to examine and offer analysis of past and current world events, be they political or business, that have shaped or shape the decisions made by politicians, businesses and individuals was amazingly insightful. Ron spoke of how those in attendance could also look at those same events to determine the direction that we lead our respective companies. I had the opportunity to spend time with him at breakfast prior to his keynote and his engagement and interaction with those of us at the table provided a great experience.

I attended a conference in May that had a number of great speakers. One was Brad Grossman, Chairman and CEO of Zeitguide. Zeitguide was founded in 2009 and provides a unique view into our ever-changing world. Zeitguide utilizes people from around the globe to “find, filter and focus” on the abundance of information that exists to provide context to all that is going on today. More importantly, Zeitguide provides crucial understanding as to what is going to happen in the future that will determine the direction an industry make take. Mr. Grossman’s talk was as inspiring as it was insightful.

Another speaker at this conference was James Spellos, President of Meeting U. Mr. Spellos talked about the importance of technology and how technology is driving or should be driving your business to the greatest success imaginable. His discussion of the use of existing and innovative technology was highly entertaining. Spellos mentioned a former Google CEO’s quote, “we create as much information in two days now as we did from the dawn of man through 2003”.  As he walked through the audience answering questions posed to him he was offering countless suggestions and ideas to more effectively use information, technology and devices, but wisely.

At a conference in June the keynote speaker was Sheryl Connelly who, for the past decade has been Ford Motor Company’s Futurist. What does a futurist do? By definition she’s looking for trends. What events, conditions or insights that can be gleaned by scouring the globe for what’s happening now that helps Ford be a leader in its industry for the very long-term. For Ford, Ms. Connelly’s insight provides them another view into the strategy they could follow, the shape of the design of their vehicle platform that will find the greatest acceptance in the market and the products or technologies that will be offered in Ford vehicles well into the future. She’s not looking at the auto industry to determine the future but the social, technological, economic, environmental and political events (or “steep” as she terms it) that will affect our lives in the next 10 to 20 years. Ms. Connelly’s talk gave me a different way to think about what I could be looking at to determine what could affect my future.

At a recent conference this month I had the opportunity to listen to Bernie Brenner, author of The Sumo Advantage and Co-Founder, Chief Strategy Officer of TrueCar, Inc. He spoke of the importance of business development (BD) in the future of any business, regardless of size, to drive strategy and indirect revenue (future revenue). He offered ideas to utilize BD to form strategic partnerships with industry heavyweights that can help build and sustain your company’s growth. Bernie’s directness and openness at the conference, in his presentation and while interacting with attendees, was both refreshing and inspirational.

Next month I’m attending an industry conference where the keynote speaker will be David Robinson (The Admiral), a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, a U.S. Navy veteran, an outstanding player in the NBA (1989-2003), a humanitarian and a partner in a private equity firm (Admiral Capital Group). I’m looking forward to hearing him detail his experiences and advice on how to achieve success in business and life.

If you have an opportunity to attend an industry conference don’t miss out on listening attentively to the keynote speakers. They typically have amazing backgrounds and experiences to share. Each speaker I listened to this year offered insight which I could use to improve myself in both my business and in my personal life. So I would highly recommend that when given the chance to register and attend conferences in your industry do so. Then take the time to listen to those that the conference organizers have selected to speak. They’ve been chosen to speak for a reason. I’ve found them to always have great messages.

Just sayin’.

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Just Sayin’ Blog – Memorial Day – A Debt of Gratitude

Interment of Major General Jesse M. Allen

Memorial Day celebrates the men and women who gave their lives in service to the Armed Forces of the United States of America. The debt of gratitude that we owe each of those who have fallen and who have given the ultimate sacrifice is a debt that cannot be repaid. Since the start of the Revolutionary War in 1775 there have been over 1,343,812 Americans who have died in service to our country. Memorial Day gives us all the opportunity to honor those who have died while serving the country by remembrances.

Recently my uncle, Retired Air Force Major General Jesse M. Allen, died. He served in both the Army and Air Force. His military service began in 1942 when he enlisted after high school and was sent to Europe during World War II. He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery earlier this month and he had a rather storied combat career serving in World War II, the Korean War and in the Viet Nam War. During the Korean and Viet Nam Wars he flew over 237 combat missions. My uncle was known to say that “If you can dream it you can become it” as he entered the service as a private and rose to the rank of major general when he retired after 30 years of service.

This day of remembrance also gives us an opportunity to recognize and honor all who serve and have served the Armed Forces of the United States. We certainly owe a debt of gratitude to every American who chose to serve and Memorial Day is an appropriate time to do so. Although I did not serve, there have been a number of my family members who have honorably served over the years starting with Ethan Allen, the leader of the Green Mountain Boys in Vermont during the Revolutionary War. Both my father and brother served as combat pilots. I am very proud of their service.

If you have served in the Armed Forces or have family or friends who have served, I’m sure that you are proud of your own service or the service that others have given to our country. Today is a great day to remember and give thanks for that service.

I have had the great honor to have worked with many people in my career who honorably served their country and I would like to thank them again for their service. The lessons that those who serve learn about loyalty, leadership, honor, integrity, and personal ethics and these are assets that they are able to build upon and utilize throughout their lives. One does not have to serve in the Armed Forces to have learned these important attributes, but those who have served have a great sense of what these values mean both on a personal and professional level.

We should all be thankful on Memorial Day for individuals who choose to serve their country by joining the military to help protect us so that we can live in a safe and secure country. I know that on this day I am very proud of my family members who have served and those that serve today. I want to thank them for their sacrifices in service to our great nation.

I hope that you take the time to give thanks for their service and sacrifice as well.

Just Sayin’…..    

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