Archive for April, 2012

Meaningful Quotes – Harbaugh, Hogan and Einstein

“Attack this day with an enthusiasm unknown to mankind.”Jack Harbaugh

“Attack this day with an enthusiasm unknown to mankind”, is what the father of two current National Football League (NFL) head coaches said to them when he dropped them off for school each morning as they were growing up. That father is Jack Harbaugh and he is the proud father of Jim Harbaugh – head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and John Harbaugh – head coach of the Baltimore Ravens. Based on the careers of both Jim and John it is apparent that their father’s entreat to them each school day provided them with the drive to be successful.

In these difficult times that many in business face, Jack Harbaugh’s advice to his sons should resonate with everyone. Enthusiasm (or passion) for what it is you’ve chosen to do in life is critical, especially if you want to be successful. It may be difficult to maintain your enthusiasm when you look around at the competitive landscape; and if you’re going to survive and grow your company not only do you have to be enthusiastic, but everyone in your company needs to exhibit the same trait. Every organization, regardless of the size, needs a leader or leaders that can help guide it through the ups and downs that surely will take place over the life of a business and help instill the enthusiasm that Jack Harbaugh instilled in his sons. Without enthusiasm, you’re doomed.

 

“There are three ways to beat somebody. Out work ‘em. Out think ‘em. Then you intimidate them. Its part of the game.” Ben Hogan, professional golfer

In his era Ben Hogan was one of the great golfers and as a child and as an adult suffered adversity which he was able to overcome. At an early age he suffered the loss of his father due to suicide and to help his family earn money he took a job as a caddie. His golf career was put on hold for three years while he served during World War II and a few years after he returned to professional golf; he and his wife were involved in a near-fatal car accident in 1949 where he sustained multiple fractures to his pelvis, collar bone, ribs and an ankle. His doctors told him that he may never walk again and that his professional golfing career was over. Not only did he walk again, but he went on to win on the professional tour and win big. Ben won 63 professional golf tournaments during his career. I think he mastered the three ways to win.

At any level in team sports coaches try to put together a group of individuals that can work together cohesively toward the ultimate goal of winning. In business, leaders and managers work toward the same goal. In business putting together a diverse group of individuals who can accomplish the various goals that the company sets is what drives success. As Ben Hogan said, to be successful at what you do you need to work hard and come up with strategies that will enable you (and your team) to win. The third way Ben used to win was to intimidate his opponents through pressure. Pressure is a factor that exists in all sports.

What I like about Ben Hogan’s quote is that you can relate it to the business world. To me it embodies the idea that even if you’re business is smaller than those with whom you compete; you can still be successful by being good at your work and by “Being Smart”. Success can be seen by fellow competitors in the marketplace as a form of intimidation or more importantly respect. Regardless of the size of your business, most often when you “out work ‘em and out think ‘em” you’ll find success. Use all three ways to your advantage as Ben Hogan said, “Its part of the game.”

 

 

“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” Albert Einstein

 

This quote, attributed to Albert Einstein, often is used to describe a business practice/strategy or two that a company never seems to change even though the business environment that the company operates is constantly changing or evolving. Over the years I’ve used the quote a number of times while trying to make a point in a business discussion with a supplier, T.P.A., employee and others. I’ve also used it while talking to one or more of my family members or friends. Perhaps you have too.

 

Often, when you’re just too close to something that you just can’t see the problem, you need someone close to you that you can trust who can tell you what they see that you’re doing in your business that’s not working. Something you’ve been doing “over and over again” while getting the same result? I’m going to guess that there are many. We tend to take a “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” approach to things we’ve done over the years that have historically worked. Einstein’s quote is very simple and straightforward. Are there things in your business that you could perhaps take another look and do a little differently to improve the performance of your business? If you make a change you may get the same result, but if you’re not willing to try; how will you ever know?

 

Just Sayin’.

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Interview with David Carnahan from Mainstreet Computers


Today I’m talking with David Carnahan, the owner of Mainstreet Computers, Inc. Mainstreet opened for business in May 1982.  Mainstreet is a leading provider of software solutions to the automotive glass repair and replacement (AGRR) industry. I’ve been fortunate to have utilized David’s software products to help manage AGRR businesses in the United States, as well as Canada. Over the years, I’ve found David as a businessman who has the highest of values, principles and ethics in operating Mainstreet. This April Mainstreet celebrates its 30th year in business.

DR:   Congratulations David! That is quite an accomplishment in the longevity of any business and one you and your employees should be most proud. How did you find yourself providing software solutions to the AGRR industry?

David Carnahan:  In those early days we sold to virtually any industry, but we concentrated on smaller businesses.  This was before the days of “off the shelf software”.  We wrote or modified our programs to suit each company we sold.  After selling to several glass shops we became more familiar with their needs and saw an opportunity to become a complete solution to glass shops across the country.  So beginning in the mid 1980’s we began focusing on glass and Glas-Avenue born.

 

DR:  What do you feel are the keys to your success in being able to build, sustain and grow Mainstreet Computers over the past 30 years?

David Carnahan:  Though there are many “keys to success”, I’d like to mention two …

1.     A mentor to Steve Jobs (the founder of Apple Computer) is quoted as saying that a company that lasts must be willing and able to reinvent itself.  I believe that is true and particularly true in the technology field.  When we started serving the glass industry back in the 1980’s we concentrated as much on selling hardware as we did on selling software but by the early 1990’s customers were better served buying hardware locally, so we changed our whole model and focused strictly on software and software solutions.  Then about seven years ago we extended that service into designing and developing websites which has proven to be a great “re-invention” as we have helped scores of glass (and other service industry) shops “re-invent” themselves and move from dying to thriving.

2.    A lasting company must have a long term mentality.  We have always hired people with the idea they would work here until they retire.  The cost in time and customer frustration of hiring and training new people is much greater that most people realize.  Most of our people have well in excess of 15 years with us.  When your people don’t expect to be around in a few years it affects every facet of the company from new product development to customer support.  It’s also makes the work environment more rewarding.

 David Carnahan (left) with Programmer Dave Daniels (right) who recently celebrated his 25th year with Mainstreet.

David Carnahan (left) with Programmer Dave Daniels (right)  who recently celebrated his 25th year with Mainstreet.

DR:  How would you describe your management style and who has been a great help to you in building your business?

David Carnahan:  I am a Christian and my faith impacts the way I lead the company.  I view Mainstreet as God’s company not my own, so I’m responsible to be a good steward of His company.  My philosophy is to find good people, treat them right and provide an environment where they can shine and excel in their strength areas.  I have a speech that I give prospective employees.  I tell them that I don’t believe in micromanaging, so … “if you’re the type of employee that only performs well with someone constantly looking over your shoulder to make sure you do your job, you won’t fit in here.”  Our people know their jobs and the mission of our company and they “just do it”.   I believe the longevity of our staff speaks for itself.

 

DR:  What lessons have you learned in growing your business that you think could be helpful to others seeking similar success?

David Carnahan:  Don’t give up.  Success is not an event, it’s a process.  I believe slow steady growth is much more stable than explosive growth. Never stop trying to improve and never take anything for granted – customers, sales or employees. 

 

DR:  What are the services that Mainstreet Computers provides to its customers and how have those changed over the past 30 years?

David Carnahan: We provide fully integrated Point Of Sale and accounting software to retail glass businesses – from small “mom and pop” shops to large multi-store chains.  We also offer website design and web hosting geared toward helping the glass shop market themselves and increase sales through the internet.  The biggest change in our strategy came 25 years ago when we began focusing primarily on the glass industry.  This strategic decision of ‘narrowing the focus to broaden the impact’ has enabled us to really gain an understanding of the needs of the glass industry.

 

DR:  How do those differ from your competitors? 

David Carnahan: Mainstreet is the first and only glass software provider to offer a fully integrated accounting system.  We wrote it ourselves and it’s specifically designed to work with our Point Of Sale program. Since we wrote it we fully support every part of it, so we’re the only contact a glass shop has to make for help with their software.  We are also the only glass software provider designing websites for the industry.

Beyond basic products, the other characteristic that sets Mainstreet apart is our level of support.  We have more people with more years of experience supporting our products than any other company.  We are relentless in our commitment to provide support that is unparalleled in the industry.

 

DR:  You’re an innovator in the industry. What were the main reasons you felt that strategy would work as successfully as it has?

David Carnahan:  The reason for our success is simple.  Mainstreet’s software and services meet a real need by enabling glass shop owners to benefit from technology without being or becoming technology experts.  We provide the technological expertise while they concentrate on running their glass business.

 

DR:  I very much appreciate your taking the time to talk with me today. In closing, is there anything further you’d like to share with the readers of this blog?

David Carnahan:  Thank you David for all you do for the glass industry.  You have a depth of knowledge and experience in this industry that is very rare.  I hope you continue to advocate for the independent glass shop owners.

Thank you David and thanks again for taking the time to talk. I know that you, your employees and company will continue to have great success in the years to come.

Just sayin’.

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